Coastal Drug Testing Hawaii

Coastal Drug Testing Hawaii

Coastal Drug Testing Hawaii provides drug and alcohol testing services at locations throughout the State of Hawaii for DOT and Non-DOT purposes for Employers and Individuals. Testing reasons can include pre-employment, random selection, post-accident, return to duty, reasonable suspicion and court ordered / probation screenings. DOT Physicals, Background checks and Drug free workplace programs are also available. Most Drug Testing Hawaii centers are within minutes of your home or office. Call Us Today, (800) 828-7086 for Drug Testing Hawaii Locations.
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Hawaii Drug And Alcohol Testing Locations

East Honolulu Kailua CDP Makakilo Urban Honolulu
Ewa Beach Kalaoa Mililani Mauka Wahiawa
Ewa Gentry Kaneohe Mililani Town Waianae
Halawa Kaneohe Station Nanakuli Wailuku
Hawaiian Paradise Park Kapaa Ocean Pointe Waimalu
Hilo Kapolei Pearl City Waimea CDP
Kahului Kihei Royal Kunia Waipahu
Kailua Lahaina Schofield Barracks Waipio

 

Additional Drug Testing Locations, Call (800) 828-7086 To Find One Near You!

Scheduling a drug, alcohol or any testing service in Hawaii is simple and easy, Call (800) 828-7086 or schedule online 24/7.

Once registered you will receive your donor pass via E-mail and then you can proceed directly to the testing center listed on your test registration form. You must register prior to proceeding to the testing center. Same day service is available and most Hawaii drug testing locations are within minutes of your home or office.

The staff of Coastal Drug Testing is committed to providing all drug and alcohol testing services in a professional, friendly and confidential manner and testing methods include urine, hair and oral saliva. Coastal Drug Testing offers a wide range of testing services with fees that are cost effective.

Available drug testing analysis includes 5, 10, 12, 14, 17 panels and expanded opioids and synthetic marijuana. Customized panels are available upon request.

Alcohol testing is available utilizing breath alcohol testing devices (EBT) and ETG testing.

Specimen analysis is conducted at certified laboratories (SAMHSA) in addition to rapid result testing which is available at most testing locations.

DOT/Government Testing

Coastal Drug Testing specializes in drug and alcohol testing Hawaii for safety sensitive employers and employees regulated by the US Department of Transportation (DOT) including USCG, FMCSA, FAA, FTA, FRA and PHMSA.   

DOT Drug Testing Hawaii services provided for the United States Coast Guard (USCG) also includes completion of the 719P USCG form.

Coastal Drug Testing also provides drug and alcohol testing for Federal Government employees and contractors required to test under the Federal Drug Free Workplace Act ( HHS ).

All Coastal Drug Testing staff are certified in DOT and Non DOT drug and alcohol testing procedures and our testing services include MRO verification and we only use SAMHSA Certified laboratories.

Employers (Companies)

If you are an employer who conducts drug and alcohol testing (DOT/Non DOT) Coastal Drug Testing can manage your entire drug and alcohol testing program including:

  • Company Drug & Alcohol Policy Development
  • Scheduling of All Testing Services
  • Drug Free Workplace Signage
  • Random Drug Testing Program
  • Medical Review Officer Verification (MRO)
  • Background Checks
  • DOT Compliance Consultation
  • Drug Free Workplace Consultation
  • Substance Abuse Professional Referral (SAP)
  • DOT / Non-DOT Physicals

Individuals (Personal)

Coastal Drug Testing provides Drug Testing Hawaii for individuals needing a drug or alcohol test for court ordered/probation, employment related or personal reasons. All tests are performed by certified drug and alcohol testing technicians and test results are provided in a confidential manner.

Hair Drug Testing

A drug test utilizing a hair specimen has a detection period of up to 90 days and a donor must have at least 1.5 inches of hair on the crown of their head. Body hair (legs, chest, under arms, beards) may also be used provided a sufficient amount of hair can be collected. Alcohol testing (ETG) can also be analyzed.

A hair drug test can be analyzed for a 5, 10, 12,14 or 17 panel screening.  In addition, hair drug testing Winter Springs FL can be customized to analyze for these additional drugs, LSD, Psychoactive Substances (mushrooms), unknown chemicals/toxins or heavy metal exposure.

Urine Drug Testing

drug test is a scientific analysis of a biological specimen such as urine, hair, blood, breath, sweat, and/or oral fluid/saliva.  This analysis is utilized to determine the presence or absence of specified parent drugs or their metabolites.

Urine drug testing detects recent drug use and employers rely on laboratory-based urine testing for its cost-effectiveness, capacity to screen for a variety of different illicit drugs and ability to withstand most legal challenges.

Urine testing is suitable for all testing reasons – from pre-employment, random, post-accident and reasonable suspicion and can be performed for a wide range of illicit and prescription drugs.

Urine drug testing is currently the most common method of drug testing and is currently the ONLY specimen type recognized for the Department of Transportation (DOT) or any Federally Mandated Drug Test.

Urine drug testing typically detects drug use within 24-72 hours and all of our urine specimens are analyzed at a lab certified by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Did You Know

Hawaii is the 50th and most recent U.S. state to join the United States, having joined on August 21, 1959. Hawaii is the only U.S. state located in Oceania and the only one composed entirely of islands. It is the northernmost island group in Polynesia, occupying most of an archipelago in the central Pacific Ocean. Hawaii is the only U.S. state not located in the Americas. The state does not observe daylight saving time. The state encompasses nearly the entire volcanic Hawaiian archipelago, which comprises hundreds of islands spread over 1,500 miles (2,400 km). At the southeastern end of the archipelago, the eight main islands are—in order from northwest to southeast: Niʻihau, Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, Kahoʻolawe, Maui and the Island of Hawaiʻi. The last is the largest island in the group; it is often called the “Big Island” or “Hawaiʻi Island” to avoid confusion with the state or archipelago. The archipelago is physiographically and ethnologically part of the Polynesian subregion of Oceania. Hawaii’s diverse natural scenery, warm tropical climate, abundance of public beaches, oceanic surroundings, and active volcanoes make it a popular destination for tourists, surfers, biologists, and volcanologists. Because of its central location in the Pacific and 19th-century labor migration, Hawaii’s culture is strongly influenced by North American and Asian cultures, in addition to its indigenous Hawaiian culture. Hawaii has over a million permanent residents, along with many visitors and U.S. military personnel. Its capital is Honolulu on the island of Oʻahu. Hawaii is the 8th-smallest and the 11th-least populous, but the 13th-most densely populated of the fifty U.S. states. It is the only state with an Asian plurality. The state’s coastline is about 750 miles (1,210 km) long, the fourth longest in the U.S. after the coastlines of Alaska, Florida and California.. The state of Hawaii derives its name from the name of its largest island, Hawaiʻi. A common Hawaiian explanation of the name of Hawaiʻi is that was named for Hawaiʻiloa, a legendary figure from Hawaiian myth. He is said to have discovered the islands when they were first settled. The Hawaiian language word Hawaiʻi is very similar to Proto-Polynesian *Sawaiki, with the reconstructed meaning “homeland”. Cognates of Hawaiʻi are found in other Polynesian languages, including Māori (Hawaiki), Rarotongan (ʻAvaiki) and Samoan (Savaiʻi) . According to linguists Pukui and Elbert, “elsewhere in Polynesia, Hawaiʻi or a cognate is the name of the underworld or of the ancestral home, but in Hawaii, the name has no meaning”. A somewhat divisive political issue arose in 1978 when the Constitution of the State of Hawaii added Hawaiian as a second official state language. The title of the state constitution is The Constitution of the State of Hawaii. Article XV, Section 1 of the Constitution uses The State of Hawaii. Diacritics were not used because the document, drafted in 1949, predates the use of the okina (ʻ) and the kahakō in modern Hawaiian orthography. The exact spelling of the state’s name in the islands’ language is Hawaiʻi. In the Hawaii Admission Act that granted Hawaiian statehood, the federal government recognized Hawaii as the official state name. Official government publications, as well as department and office titles, use the traditional Hawaiian spelling with no symbols for glottal stops or vowel length. In contrast, the National and State Parks Services, the University of Hawaiʻi and some private enterprises implement these symbols. A precedent for changes to U.S. state names was set in 1780 when the Massachusetts Bay State changed its name to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the 1820s when the Territory of Arkansaw changed the spelling of its name to the Territory of Arkansas.. Hawaii is one of four U.S. states—apart from the original thirteen—the Vermont Republic (1791), the Republic of Texas (1845), and the California Republic (1846)—that were independent nations prior to statehood. Along with Texas, Hawaii had formal, international diplomatic recognition as a nation. The Kingdom of Hawaiʻi was sovereign from 1810 until 1893 when the monarchy was overthrown by resident American and European capitalists and landholders in a coup d’état. Hawaii was an independent republic from 1894 until August 12, 1898, when it officially became a territory of the United States. Hawaii was admitted as a U.S. state on August 21, 1959. Based on archaeological evidence, the earliest habitation of the Hawaiian Islands dates to around 300 CE, probably by Polynesian settlers from the Marquesas Islands. A second wave of migration from Raiatea and Bora Bora took place in the 11th century. The date of the human discovery and habitation of the Hawaiian Islands is the subject of academic debate. Some archaeologists and historians believe there was an early settlement from the Marquesas. They think it was a later wave of immigrants from Tahiti around 1000 CE who introduced a new line of high chiefs, the kapu system, the practice of human sacrifice, and the building of heiau. This later immigration is detailed in Hawaiian mythology (moʻolelo) about Paʻao. Other authors say there is no archaeological or linguistic evidence for a later influx of Tahitian settlers and that Paʻao must be regarded as a myth. The history of the islands is marked by a slow, steady growth in population and the size of the chiefdoms, which grew to encompass whole islands. Local chiefs, called aliʻi, ruled their settlements, and launched wars to extend their influence and defend their communities from predatory rivals. Ancient Hawaii was a caste-based society, much like that of Hindus in India.

To Schedule a Drug, Alcohol or DNA Test at a Hawaii Location Call (800) 828-7086 or click to schedule now online 24/7.

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